Sunday, 12 August 2018 21:45

Fury vs Wilder in November? Not wise for Brit

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Charismatic former heavyweight champion Tyson Fury insists he's fighting WBC champ Deontay Wilder in November.

Of course, the Brit faces Francesco Pianeta next week in what should be little more than a glorified sparring session.

“One hundred percent the plan is to fight Wilder before the end of the year," stated Fury recently via BoxingScene.com.

Will we see Fury vs Wilder by year's end?

"Fighting Wilder is going to happen and it’s not a publicity stunt. If the fight wasn’t happening I wouldn’t say it is. If I get past Pianeta then the fight is on. It’s on like Donkey Kong."

“I’ll get past Pianeta and then I’ll go and fight Wilder somewhere. But it isn’t going to happen if I don’t win – Beyonce Wilder is in the future.”

Seriously?

With Tyson Fury you never really know for sure.

If Fury struggles with Pianeta, I don't see his handlers feeding him to Wilder in November. In fact, even if he looks brilliant against Pianeta, he won't be ready for Wilder so soon.

Why?

For starters, he will have had just two fights after a 2 1/2 hiatus. Secondly, during that time he was being treated for cocaine addiction and blew up to nearly 400 pounds. And yes, in April 2017, we saw then 41-year-old Wladimir Klitschko, after a 1 1/2 hiatus, fight marvelously against Anthony Joshua but 1 1/2 years isn't 2 1/2 years, and Wlad wasn't fighting a cocaine addiction and didn't blow up so much in weight.

The consummate professional, Wlad was superbly prepared for Joshua.

Fury has lost most of the weight and seems to be over his addiction, but the young man still has some ring rust to shake off. Simply put, he won't be ready to face an opponent as active, skilled and sharp as Deontay Wilder. 

Given the obstacles Fury has created for himself, I can't imagine him being a threat to Wilder so soon. It will take a while longer for him to regain top form, physically and mentally.

He'll need more time to fully regain his timing, rhythm, footwork, conditioning and the feeling of fighting live under the big lights and cameras. It's easy to spar in the gym, but fighting live on the big stage is a whole different animal that takes getting used to.

As for Deontay Wilder, let's not forget he was an Olympic bronze medalist and is fundamentally sound, regardless of the ‘wild man’ staple given to him by his critics. Moreover, he is explosive and can crack. Hence, he's 40-0, 39 KOs and has knocked out every opponent he's faced.

He punches harder than Fury ever has, is faster and doesn't take as many "flush" shots as Tyson, even when the latter was at his best.

And one more element - Size.  Fury is bigger than Wilder but at 6'7" / 83-inch reach, Deontay is taller and rangier than the typical Fury opponent.

What's going to happen when Fury starts getting whacked at distances that were routinely safe against previous opponents? Will he, at such an early stage in his comeback, be able to intuitively make the proper adjustments?

To regain his old form, Fury will need two years of sobriety and at least two more tune-ups, post Pianeta next week.

Please share your thoughts on Fury vs Wilder.

 

 

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