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Tuesday, 08 August 2017 00:00

Foot-stomping in boxing: What is it? (Video)

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When an opponent has superior speed and movement, a fighter will sometimes implement an old trick called foot-stomping.

How is it done?

When in range, a fighter will step out of his stance and stomp his opponent's left foot with his right, hold it there and punch. (When both fighters are orthodox or southpaw).

Obviously, a fighter's rhythm and ability to move will be impaired with his opponent's foot sitting on the top of his own.

The trick works best when one fighter is orthodox and the other a southpaw because a fighter can more easily step on his opponent's lead foot.

Is footstomping legal?
The rules of boxing vary from jurisdiction to jurisdiction and the legality of footstomping is highly subjective. Some say it's illegal but I've never seen a fighter warned for foot-stomping and there's no rule that clearly states it's illegal. Moreover, when orthodox fighters face southpaws accidental foot-stomping is not uncommon due to the position of the fighters' lead foot.


One rule states: You can't hold your opponent and hit him at the same time, or duck so low that your head is below your opponent's belt line.

Can footstomping be considered "holding" an opponent?

Maybe.

A referee can certainly take points away for foot-stomping and some probably have when the tactic was performed in excess.

In 2011, famed trainer Freddie Roach told FightSaga, "When lefties fight righties it happens all the time."

"When I fought Camacho, I knocked him down by stepping on his foot. It was really a slip, but they counted it anyway. So it happens and it's part of fighting a southpaw, so I don't think it should be that big of an issue."

"...It's part of the sport. I teach guys to do it myself. When you fight a southpaw, you take advantages that are there."

Despite the claims in the video below, foot-stomping is not cheating, according to Freddie Roach.

 

 

 

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